Blog

On Monday 4 September, over 30 mostly Heeley Labour Party activists turned out over the three actions being held at lunchtime and teatime at Archer Road and an hour in between times at Farm Road. DSCN0582.JPG

McStrike action held on 4 September

On Monday 4 September, over 30 mostly Heeley Labour Party activists turned out over the three actions being held at lunchtime and teatime at Archer Road and an hour in... Read more

The Heeley CLP Naylor Review subgroup include members Romola Guiton, Andrea Warner, Barry Fitzgerald and others who have attended one or more meetings to investigate and discuss this report which focuses on selling off NHS assets.

Report from Heeley CLP Naylor Review sub group

The Heeley CLP Naylor Review subgroup include members Romola Guiton, Andrea Warner, Barry Fitzgerald and others who have attended one or more meetings to investigate and discuss this report which... Read more

The next Radical Readers book group meeting, which is open to all those interested in the topics being discussed, is taking place on Wednesday 13 September, 6.30pm at the Mugen Tearooms, Scotland Street, S3 7AA.

Radical Readers book group meeting - 13 September

The next Radical Readers book group meeting, which is open to all those interested in the topics being discussed, is taking place on Wednesday 13 September, 6.30pm at the Mugen Tearooms,... Read more

What do you think of when someone talks to you about trade unions? Is it of a diverse leadership that represents a variety of workers? Or does male, pale and stale come to mind?

Sheffield Central CLP event: Trade Unions - Male, Pale and Stale?

What do you think of when someone talks to you about trade unions? Is it of a diverse leadership that represents a variety of workers? Or does male, pale and... Read more

There are still places available on this briefing for union activists and officers, organised by the TUC Yorkshire and the Humber.

TUC "Enforcing the minimum wage" briefing - 7 September, Leeds

There are still places available on this briefing for union activists and officers, organised by the TUC Yorkshire and the Humber. Read more

mcstrike-placard2_small.jpg

Gleadless Valley branch of Heeley CLP has pledged support for the National Day of Action for Fast Food Workers on Monday 4 September. Alongside the Sheffield Needs a Pay Rise campaign we will be organising solidarity action at the McDonalds branch on Archer Road, which is in the Heeley constituency.

National Day of Action for Fast Food Workers - 4 September

Gleadless Valley branch of Heeley CLP has pledged support for the National Day of Action for Fast Food Workers on Monday 4 September. Alongside the Sheffield Needs a Pay Rise... Read more

Report by Paul Scarrott, Political Education Officer, Heeley Constituency Labour Party

 Messaging1500380108635.jpg

 

Sheffield Heeley Constituency Labour Party's policy forum on the economy, business and trade was launched last week.

Twenty nine Labour Party members from Heeley and other parts of Sheffield discussed the national and local economy.

Messaging1500380118052.jpg

The forum was the first of many opportunities to contribute to the development of one of the eight strands of national Labour's policy in the National Policy Forum.

It took place against the backdrop of the continuing deterioration in the economy and living standards under the Tory government.

A key principle of the forum was that economics is for everyone, not just the so-called experts: most of whom failed to foresee the 2008 Crash and who have supported the failed policy of austerity.

The discussion concentrated on how to build on the success of Labour setting the agenda in the recent general election on improving the living standards of the many.

The forum gave members an opportunity to discuss the importance of the breakthrough in Labour's economic policy under Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell of borrowing to invest, not borrowing to consume.

Alongside that members considered the progress made in winning the national debate that austerity is a choice, not an economic necessity.

A choice which is not motivated by the desire to reducing the deficit and the national debt, but primarily to boost profits; reduce wages as a share of the economy; tear up the post-war settlement and to replace the welfare state with the small state.

Much of the discussion looked at the terrible consequences of the chronic levels of underinvestment in the British economy.

Members welcomed the proposals under Jeremy Corbyn's leadership to create a national and local investment banks.

There was a recognition that public investment in infrastructure, housing, education and training are the cornerstones of the regeneration of the economy.

The determination of the Labour Party not to blame immigrants or minority communities for the country's economic woes was also seen as an important policy asset.

The national proposals to renationalise the railways and other key sectors of the economy was also met with approval.

How we defeat the Tory hard Brexit and the plans to use Brexit to lower living standards was very much on people's minds.

There were some thoughtful debates about the benefits of of maintaining membership of the single market, tariff free access and freedom of movement.

People were also keen to build on the success of the national general election campaign in winning hearts and minds of millions by changing the narrative about the country's economic priorities.

Numerous contributions also raised important questions about the potential for local councils to play a role in economic regeneration under a Labour government with investment in areas such as housing, Green Energy, skills and transport.  

The forum was very much the beginning of a discussion rather than the finished article.

A big range of topics for future consideration was suggested in the final discussion.

Members were keen to meet regularly to discuss issues in more detail and with invited speakers who could provide in-depth analysis.

A programme for future discussions will be shared after further consideration by Heeley CLP.

 

Winning economic arguments for Labour

Report by Paul Scarrott, Political Education Officer, Heeley Constituency Labour Party     Sheffield Heeley Constituency Labour Party's policy forum on the economy, business and trade was launched last week....

schools_funding_thumb-600x0.png
Schools across Sheffield face losing hundreds of pounds per pupil if new Government funding proposals get the go-ahead:

Campaigners say that 98 per cent of schools will be worse off because rising prices and cost pressures will cancel out any increase if ministers introduce the new National Funding Formula

Schools in Sheffield could lose up to 13 per cent - £362 - per pupil and in Doncaster up to 12 per cent - £425, by 2020..

Last year, Sheffield was among the worst funded cities with an average of £4,422 per pupil - around £2,000 less per pupil than Hackney, in London and £600 behind Liverpool.

Louise Haigh, MP for Sheffield Heeley, is calling on the Secretary of State for Education to make urgent representations to the Chancellor to deliver extra resources for schools in his Budget statement to Parliament on March 8.

She said: "The new funding formula was already robbing Peter to pay Paul by cutting money from some schools to give to others, but these new figures prove the Government is actually taking with both hands.”

“These stealth cuts will have a huge impact on pupils in my area. Already we don’t get our fair share of funding and that has real consequences – a school in my constituency had to close down a fantastic summer programme last year which gave kids additional support to get them up to speed for the new school year."

“The Tories have to realise that if they keep starving our city’s schools of funding then they are neglecting a whole generation of students. Those students are seeing class sizes rise, teachers under strain and educational support wither. I will fight hard to make sure our city gets its fair share.”


Tory cuts to our local schools

Schools across Sheffield face losing hundreds of pounds per pupil if new Government funding proposals get the go-ahead: Campaigners say that 98 per cent of schools will be worse off...

eastern_avenue_thumb-600x0.png

 

The Government are proposing to close Eastern Avenue job centre at Manor Top and move it across town to the City Centre.

We, the undersigned, believe the proposal:

  • Will affect thousands including the disabled and raises real questions about accessibility.
  • Will force those who use the job centre to fork out money they cannot afford to travel across town.
  • That the job centre should remain an important part of the community, as close to people as possible.
  • That it is shameful the Government announced the closure without conducting an impact assessment.
  • And that it affects seventy job centre staff.

We therefore think the Government should halt the plan to close this job centre which is in an area of real need.

 

Click here to sign the petition.

Save Eastern Avenue Jobcentre

  The Government are proposing to close Eastern Avenue job centre at Manor Top and move it across town to the City Centre. We, the undersigned, believe the proposal: Will affect...

We created the NHS – and we are going to save it. Take a look at the history of the NHS & our pledges: http://labour.org.uk/nhs

Then and now - A history of our NHS

We created the NHS – and we are going to save it. Take a look at the history of the NHS & our pledges: http://labour.org.uk/nhs

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.